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Economic Growth Continues In 2011

12/8/2010 - Tempe, AZ - According to a report from the Institute for Supply Management, "Economic growth in the United States will continue in 2011, say the nation's purchasing and supply management executives in their December 2010 Semiannual Economic Forecast. Expectations are for a continuation of the economic recovery that began in mid-2009. The manufacturing sector continues to outpace the non-manufacturing sector and has greater expectations for growth in terms of revenue, say the nation's purchasing and supply management executives in their December 2010 Semiannual Economic Forecast. The overall forecast projects optimism about the U.S. economy for 2011. The manufacturing sector, overall, is positive about prospects in 2011 with revenues expected to increase in 16 of 18 industries, while the non-manufacturing sector appears slightly less positive about the year ahead, with 12 of 18 industries expecting higher revenues. Business investment, a major driver in the U.S. economy, will increase substantially in the manufacturing sector, while investment in the non-manufacturing sector will increase at a lower level. These projections are part of the forecast issued by the Business Survey Committee of the Institute for Supply Management (ISM). The forecast was released today by Norbert J. Ore, CPSM, C.P.M., chair of the ISM Manufacturing Business Survey Committee; and by Anthony S. Nieves, C.P.M., CFPM, chair of the ISM Non-Manufacturing Business Survey Committee. Manufacturing Summary: Expectations for 2011 are positive as 65 percent of survey respondents expect revenues to be greater in 2011 than in 2010. The panel of purchasing and supply executives expects a 5.6 percent net increase in overall revenues for 2011, compared to a 7.9 percent increase reported for 2010. The 16 manufacturing industries expecting improvement over 2010 — listed in order — are: Primary Metals; Fabricated Metal Products; Petroleum & Coal Products; Apparel, Leather & Allied Products; Transportation Equipment; Miscellaneous Manufacturing; Furniture & Related Products; Plastics & Rubber Products; Machinery; Textile Mills; Wood Products; Electrical Equipment, Appliances & Components; Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products; Printing & Related Support Activities; Chemical Products; and Paper Products. "Manufacturing purchasing and supply executives have expectations for continued growth and are optimistic about their organizations' prospects as they consider the first half of 2011, and they are even more positive about the second half," said Ore. "While 2010 has been a year of recovery in manufacturing, our forecast sees improvements in both investment and employment in 2011. Respondents expect cost pressures in 2011 to be somewhat greater than in 2010. Manufacturing growth is now in its 16th consecutive month as measured by and reported in the monthly Manufacturing ISM Report On Business." In the manufacturing sector, respondents report operating at 80.2 percent of their normal capacity, up from 72.8 percent reported in April 2010. Purchasing and supply executives predict that capital expenditures will increase by 14.5 percent in 2011, compared to a 5.9 percent increase reported for 2010. Survey respondents also forecast that they will reduce inventories in an effort to improve their purchased inventory-to-sales ratio in 2011. Manufacturers have an expectation that employment in the sector will increase by 1.8 percent, while labor and benefits costs are expected to increase an average of 1.9 percent in 2011. Manufacturing purchasers are predicting strength in exports and imports in 2011. They also expect the U.S. dollar to weaken on average against the currencies of major trading partners. The panel also predicts the prices they pay will increase 2.7 percent during the first four months of 2011, and will increase an additional 1.3 percent during the balance of the year, with an overall increase of 4 percent for 2011. Survey respondents expect to realize supply chain improvements through improved inventory/asset management; cost reduction; supplier development/better metrics; supplier consolidation; and better risk management. Non-Manufacturing Summary: Fifty-one percent of non-manufacturing supply management executives expect their 2011 revenues to be greater than in 2010. They currently expect a 3.4 percent net increase in overall revenues for 2011 compared to a 0.2 percent increase reported for 2010. The 12 non-manufacturing industries expecting revenue improvement in 2011 over 2010 — listed in order — are: Mining; Transportation & Warehousing; Retail Trade; Information; Wholesale Trade; Accommodation & Food Services; Management of Companies & Support Services; Finance & Insurance; Utilities; Educational Services; Other Services; and Health Care & Social Assistance. "Non-manufacturing supply managers report operating at 82.9 percent of their normal capacity, below the 83.6 percent reported in April 2010. They are optimistic about continued growth in the first half of 2011 compared to the second half of 2010, and they have a higher level of optimism about the next 12 months than they had last December for 2010," said Nieves. "They forecast that their capacity to produce products and provide services will rise by 2 percent during 2011, and capital expenditures will increase by 3.7 percent from the 2010 level. Non-manufacturers also predict that their employment will increase by 0.3 percent during 2011." Respondents in non-manufacturing industries expect that the prices they pay for materials and services will increase by 3.1 percent during 2011. They also forecast their overall labor and benefit costs will increase 1.1 percent for 2011. Profit margins are reported to have decreased in the second and third quarters of 2010, and respondents expect them to increase between now and April 2011. Survey respondents indicate that process improvement is the most frequently cited means of improving supply chains in 2011. Other improvement approaches include: Enhancement and leverage of technology; product rationalization; supplier management/consolidation; improved inventory management; and strategic cost management. Operating Rate - Manufacturing: Manufacturing purchasing and supply executives report their companies are currently operating at 80.2 percent of normal capacity. This is a significant increase when compared to April 2010 (72.8 percent) and December 2009 (70.1 percent). The November data from the Manufacturing ISM Report On Business indicates the manufacturing sector is in its 16th consecutive month of growth. The following 11 industries — listed in order — are operating above the average rate of 80.2 percent: Apparel, Leather & Allied Products; Plastics & Rubber Products; Paper Products; Miscellaneous Manufacturing; Electrical Equipment, Appliances & Components; Textile Mills; Chemical Products; Computer & Electronic Products; Machinery; Fabricated Metal Products; and Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products. Non-Manufacturing: Non-manufacturing supply executives report that their organizations are currently operating at 82.9 percent of normal capacity. This is lower than the 83.6 percent reported in April 2010, and higher than the 81.3 percent reported in December 2009. Considering production capacity increases reported in the following section of this forecast, this indicates that non-manufacturing industries are continuing to add capacity, but also find it necessary to maintain their utilization of capacity at a relatively high level. The following 10 industries — listed in order — are operating at or above the average capacity level of 82.9 percent: Information; Mining; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Educational Services; Transportation & Warehousing; Utilities; Finance & Insurance; Other Services; Health Care & Social Assistance; and Public Administration. Production Capacity - Manufacturing: Production capacity in manufacturing increased 7.5 percent in 2010 as 43 percent of purchasing and supply executives reported an average capacity increase of 21.1 percent, 6 percent reported decreases averaging 22.5 percent, and 51 percent reported no change. This compares to a predicted increase of 6.4 percent for 2010 made in April 2010. Expectations for 2011 are for an increase of 5.2 percent. The following 14 industries report achieving an increase in production capacity in 2010: Fabricated Metal Products; Petroleum & Coal Products; Primary Metals; Plastics & Rubber Products; Textile Mills; Electrical Equipment, Appliances & Components; Computer & Electronic Products; Transportation Equipment; Apparel, Leather & Allied Products; Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products; Wood Products; Machinery; Chemical Products; and Paper Products. The principal means of achieving increases in production capacity in 2010 were (in order of importance): More hours worked with existing personnel; additional personnel (permanent, temporary or contract); additional plant and/or equipment; replaced equipment with technically advanced equipment. Non-Manufacturing: The capacity to produce products or provide services in the non-manufacturing sector increased 0.5 percent during 2010. This compares to the 1.4 percent decrease reported in December 2009 for the year 2009, and is less than the prediction in April 2010 of a 2.3 percent increase for 2010. For 2011, an increase (2 percent) is predicted. For 2010, 22 percent of non-manufacturing supply managers indicate increases averaging 11.1 percent, and 14 percent of respondents indicate decreases averaging 14.4 percent. Sixty-four percent see no change in their capacity. The seven industries reporting increases in capacity in 2010 are: Mining; Wholesale Trade; Transportation & Warehousing; Retail Trade; Utilities; Accommodation & Food Services; and Other Services. The principal means of achieving increases in production capacity in 2010 were (in order of importance): More hours worked with existing personnel; additional plant and/or equipment; additional personnel (permanent, temporary or contract); replaced equipment with technically advanced equipment. Capital Expenditures — 2010 vs. 2009 - Manufacturing: Purchasing and supply managers report 2010 capital expenditures increased 5.9 percent when compared to 2009 levels. The actual expenditures for 2010 exceed survey respondents' previous expectations as they predicted an increase of 2 percent for 2010 in April 2010. The 47 percent of purchasers who reported increased capital expenditures in 2010 indicated an average increase of 27.3 percent, while the 18 percent who said their capital spending was reduced reported an average decrease of 41.1 percent. Thirty-five percent of respondents said they spent the same in 2010 as in 2009. The 11 industries showing increases in capital expenditures for 2010 — in order of percentage increase — are: Paper Products; Transportation Equipment; Machinery; Electrical Equipment, Appliances & Components; Miscellaneous Manufacturing; Textile Mills; Fabricated Metal Products; Nonmetallic Mineral Products; Printing & Related Support Activities; Computer & Electronic Products; and Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products. Non-Manufacturing: Non-manufacturing supply management executives report their level of capital expenditures in 2010 compared to 2009 declined 0.1 percent. This compares to the 4.2 percent decrease reported for 2009 one year ago, and is significantly less than the 1.9 percent increase predicted by respondents in April 2010. Thirty-three percent of respondents report increases averaging 16.6 percent. An additional 26 percent report decreases averaging 22.3 percent. Forty-one percent indicate they spent the same on capital expenditures in 2010 as in 2009. The 10 industries experiencing increases in capital expenditures in 2010 — listed in order — are: Retail Trade; Transportation & Warehousing; Other Services; Information; Arts, Entertainment & Recreation; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Construction; Finance & Insurance; Wholesale Trade; and Accommodation & Food Services. Predicted Capital Expenditures — 2011 vs. 2010 - Manufacturing: Purchasing and supply executives expect capital expenditures to increase 14.5 percent in 2011. The 50 percent of respondents who predict increased capital expenditures in 2011 indicate an average increase of 35.9 percent, while the 12 percent who said their capital spending would be reduced predict an average decrease of 27.6 percent. Thirty-eight percent said they expect to spend the same in 2011 as in 2010. The 15 industries predicting increases in capital expenditures for 2011 — in order of percentage increase — are: Electrical Equipment, Appliances & Components; Plastics & Rubber Products; Petroleum & Coal Products; Fabricated Metal Products; Computer & Electronic Products; Transportation Equipment; Textile Mills; Wood Products; Furniture & Related Products; Miscellaneous Manufacturing; Apparel, Leather & Allied Products; Chemical Products; Machinery; Nonmetallic Mineral Products; and Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products. Non-Manufacturing: Non-manufacturing purchasing and supply executives are expecting an increase of 3.7 percent in capital expenditures in 2011 from the decrease of 0.1 percent they are reporting for 2010. The 42 percent of respondents expecting to spend more on capital expenditures predict an average increase of 19.3 percent. An additional 16 percent anticipate a decrease averaging 28.6 percent. Forty-two percent expect to spend the same on capital expenditures in 2011 as in 2010. The 12 industries expecting increases in capital expenditures in 2011 — in order of percentage increase — are: Arts, Entertainment & Recreation; Transportation & Warehousing; Information; Retail Trade; Mining; Accommodation & Food Services; Wholesale Trade; Health Care & Social Assistance; Construction; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Finance & Insurance; and Professional, Scientific & Technical Services. Prices — Changes Between End of 2009 and End of 2010 - Manufacturing: After an initial forecast in April 2010 of a 3.8 percent increase in prices paid, survey respondents now report realized price increases averaging 3.4 percent for the year. The 68 percent who say their prices are higher now than at the end of 2009 report an average increase of 6.3 percent, while the 17 percent who report lower prices averaged a 5.1 percent decrease. The remaining 15 percent indicate no change between the end of 2009 and the end of 2010. The 16 industries experiencing price increases — listed in order — are: Petroleum & Coal Products; Plastics & Rubber Products; Primary Metals; Paper Products; Printing & Related Support Activities; Textile Mills; Wood Products; Machinery; Transportation Equipment; Fabricated Metal Products; Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products; Chemical Products; Apparel, Leather & Allied Products; Electrical Equipment, Appliances & Components; Furniture & Related Products; and Computer & Electronic Products. Non-Manufacturing: As 2010 draws to a close, non-manufacturing supply managers report prices they pay have increased by 2.2 percent over the entire year. This is more than the 1.7 percent increase they predicted in April 2010, and the same as the 2.2 percent decrease reported one year ago for 2009. Fifty-eight percent of purchasers report price increases averaging 5 percent. Twelve percent of purchasers indicate decreased prices with an average reduction of 6.3 percent, and 30 percent of respondents have not experienced overall price changes this year. The 16 industries reporting price increases in 2010 — listed in order — are: Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Wholesale Trade; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Retail Trade; Arts, Entertainment & Recreation; Other Services; Health Care & Social Assistance; Transportation & Warehousing; Information; Public Administration; Utilities; Educational Services; Accommodation & Food Services; Finance & Insurance; Management of Companies & Support Services; and Construction. Prices — Predicted Changes Between End of 2010 and April 2011 Manufacturing: Sixty-eight percent of purchasing and supply managers expect the prices they pay to increase in early 2011 by an average of 4.8 percent. At the same time, 12 percent anticipate decreases averaging 4.9 percent. Including the 20 percent who expect no change in prices in the first four months of 2011, purchasers expect the net average overall price change to increase 2.7 percent for the first four months of 2011. The 10 industries predicting increases in prices paid in the first part of 2010 higher than the 2.7 percent average — listed in order — are: Primary Metals; Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products; Textile Mills; Apparel, Leather & Allied Products; Fabricated Metal Products; Transportation Equipment; Plastics & Rubber Products; Printing & Related Support Activities; Chemical Products; and Furniture & Related Products. Non-Manufacturing: Non-manufacturing survey respondents predict that their purchases in the first four months of 2011 will cost an average of 2.5 percent more than at the end of 2010. This is slightly more than the 2.2 percent increase reported in the preceding section for all of 2010. Considering the prediction of a price change for all of 2011 (3.1 percent), purchasing and supply executives apparently expect most of next year's price increases to occur in the first part of the year. Sixty-five percent of non-manufacturing respondents predict the prices they pay will increase an average of 4.4 percent in the first part of 2011. Seven percent of respondents expect price decreases averaging 5.4 percent. The remaining 28 percent predict no change in prices in the first four months of 2011. The 10 industries predicting greater than or equal to the 2.5 percent average increase in prices they expect to pay in the first part of 2011 — in order of percentage increase — are: Construction; Wholesale Trade; Professional, Scientific & Technical Services; Other Services; Information; Public Administration; Arts, Entertainment & Recreation; Transportation & Warehousing; Utilities; and Retail Trade. Prices — Predicted Changes Between End of 2010 and End of 2011 - Manufacturing: Respondents predict a net average increase in prices paid of 4 percent between December 2010 and December 2011, indicating they expect prices to increase an additional 1.3 percent during the period of April 2011 through December 2011. Seventy-five percent of respondents expect an average price increase of 6.1 percent, while 11 percent expect an average decline of 5.4 percent. The remaining 14 percent expect no change in their average prices paid for the year. The nine industries expecting to receive above-average increases by the end of 2011 — listed in order — are: Petroleum & Coal Products; Primary Metals; Plastics & Rubber Products; Fabricated Metal Products; Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products; Paper Products; Textile Mills; Wood Products; and Apparel, Leather & Allied Products. Non-Manufacturing: For all of 2011, non-manufacturing supply management executives expect their prices to increase an average of 3.1 percent. Seventy-one percent of respondents expect increases averaging 5.1 percent, 8 percent anticipate prices to drop an average of 6.2 percent, and 21 percent foresee no change in prices during the next year. The 10 industries expecting greater than the 3.1 percent average price increase by the end of 2011 — in order of percentage increase — are: Wholesale Trade; Construction; Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Accommodation & Food Services; Educational Services; Information; Utilities; Arts, Entertainment & Recreation; Public Administration; and Retail Trade. Labor and Benefit Costs — Predicted Rate Change End of 2010 vs. End of 2011 - Manufacturing: Purchasing and supply executives expect higher overall labor and benefit costs for 2011. Sixty-six percent of respondents expect increased labor and benefit costs and expect them to grow by an average of 3.5 percent for all of 2011, while the 4 percent forecasting lower costs see them decreasing by an average of 12.6 percent. Including the 30 percent of respondents who believe costs will remain the same, the expected overall net rate of increase is 1.9 percent between the end of 2010 and the end of 2011. The 12 industries expecting to pay an increase of 1.9 percent or higher — in order of percentage increase — are: Textile Mills; Petroleum & Coal Products; Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products; Primary Metals; Paper Products; Fabricated Metal Products; Apparel, Leather & Allied Products; Miscellaneous Manufacturing; Machinery; Furniture & Related Products; Plastics & Rubber Products; and Wood Products. Non-Manufacturing: Purchasing and supply executives' expectation is for a 1.1 percent increase in labor and benefit costs for non-manufacturing industries in 2011. Fifty-six percent of respondents expect such costs to increase by an average of 3.5 percent. Another 10 percent of respondents expect labor and benefit costs to shrink by an average of 9.3 percent, and 34 percent believe costs will remain stable during 2011. The 15 industries expecting increases in labor and benefit costs in 2011 over 2010 — in order of percentage increase — are: Real Estate, Rental & Leasing; Other Services; Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Transportation & Warehousing; Accommodation & Food Services; Utilities; Information; Health Care & Social Assistance; Management of Companies & Support Services; Retail Trade; Arts, Entertainment & Recreation; Finance & Insurance; Professional, Scientific & Technical Services; Construction; and Wholesale Trade. Employment - Change in Overall Employment - Manufacturing: ISM's Manufacturing Business Survey Committee members report that manufacturing employment increased 7.1 percent since April 2010, and forecast that employment will increase, on average, 1.8 percent for the full year of 2011. Forty percent of respondents expect employment to be 6.2 percent higher, while 9 percent predict employment to be lower by 7.8 percent. The remaining 51 percent of respondents expect their employment levels to be unchanged in 2011. The 13 industries predicting increases in employment in 2011 — listed in order — are: Wood Products; Fabricated Metal Products; Primary Metals; Miscellaneous Manufacturing; Furniture & Related Products; Transportation Equipment; Computer & Electronic Products; Apparel, Leather & Allied Products; Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products; Electrical Equipment, Appliances & Components; Nonmetallic Mineral Products; Chemical Products; and Machinery. Non-Manufacturing: ISM's Non-Manufacturing Business Survey Committee members report that non-manufacturing employment has decreased 2.1 percent since April 2010. Looking ahead to 2011, they forecast that employment will increase 0.3 percent by the end of 2011. For 2011, 27 percent of respondents expect higher levels of employment, 20 percent anticipate lower levels, and 53 percent expect their employment levels to be unchanged. The six industries anticipating increases in their employment in 2011 — listed in order — are: Mining; Transportation & Warehousing; Retail Trade; Professional, Scientific & Technical Services; Wholesale Trade; and Information. Note: A diffusion index above 50 percent would generally indicate an expectation of higher employment; below 50 percent, an expectation of lower employment. Export Business — Predicted Change for Next Half Year (First Half of 2011) - Manufacturing: The responses for this semiannual report indicate purchasers see increases in new export orders for the first half of 2011. This is consistent with the most recent ISM New Export Orders Index data in the monthly Manufacturing ISM Report On Businessฎ, which has shown growth in new export orders in the last 17 months. Of the 85 percent of respondents who export, 60 percent predict an increase (53 percent moderate and 7 percent substantial) over the next half year. Three percent of respondents (3 percent moderate and 0 percent substantial) predict a decrease in their exports, and 37 percent anticipate no change in exports over the next half year. The 14 industries expecting growth in exports during the first half of 2011 — listed in order — are: Apparel, Leather & Allied Products; Primary Metals; Petroleum & Coal Products; Textile Mills; Paper Products; Miscellaneous Manufacturing; Fabricated Metal Products; Plastics & Rubber Products; Electrical Equipment, Appliances & Components; Computer & Electronic Products; Transportation Equipment; Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products; Machinery; and Chemical Products. Non-Manufacturing: For the first half of 2011, non-manufacturing supply managers who report that their organizations engage in exporting feel more optimistic than they did one year ago concerning their export business. Of the 20 percent of non-manufacturing business survey respondents who report that they export, 32 percent predict an increase (20 percent moderate and 12 percent substantial) over the next half year. Four percent of the respondents expect a decrease in their exports (0 percent moderate and 4 percent substantial), and 64 percent anticipate no change in exports over the next half year. Of the industries that report they export, the following five industries expect growth in export business in the first half of 2011: Transportation & Warehousing; Professional, Scientific & Technical Services; Wholesale Trade; Finance & Insurance; and Retail Trade. Import Business — Predicted Change for Next Half Year (First Half of 2011) - Manufacturing: Purchasers expect increases in imports in the first half of 2011. Of the 91 percent of purchasers who reported they import, 48 percent predict an increase in their imports over the next half year (42 percent moderate and 6 percent substantial), while 10 percent predict a decrease in imports of materials (9 percent moderate and 1 percent substantial). Less than half of survey respondents (42 percent) expect no change in imports. The 14 industries expecting growth in imports — listed in order — are: Nonmetallic Mineral Products; Apparel, Leather & Allied Products; Petroleum & Coal Products; Wood Products; Machinery; Primary Metals; Transportation Equipment; Electrical Equipment, Appliances & Components; Miscellaneous Manufacturing; Paper Products; Chemical Products; Computer & Electronic Products; Fabricated Metal Products; and Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products. Non-Manufacturing: Non-manufacturers have higher expectations for the use of imports for the first half of 2011 than they did in December 2009 for the first half of 2010. Of the 47 percent of non-manufacturing organizations who reported they import, 34 percent (27 percent moderate and 7 percent substantial) predict an increase in their imports during the first half of 2011. Seven percent of the respondents (7 percent moderate and 0 percent substantial) predict a decrease in imports of materials and services. The remaining 59 percent of purchasers expect no change in imports over the next half year. The nine industries expecting growth in imports — listed in order — are: Information; Wholesale Trade; Retail Trade; Professional, Scientific & Technical Services; Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Other Services; Transportation & Warehousing; Accommodation & Food Services; and Finance & Insurance. Business Revenues - Business Revenues Comparison — 2010 vs. 2009 - Manufacturing: Summarizing revenues for 2010, 67 percent of respondents say revenue was better than 2009, and that nominal (before adjusting for inflation) revenues increased an average of 14.1 percent over 2009. Conversely, 14 percent say their nominal revenues decreased in 2010 by an average of 11.1 percent, and the remaining 19 percent indicate no change. Overall, purchasing and supply executives indicate a net nominal increase of 7.9 percent in business revenues for 2010 over 2009. This is greater than the 6.3 percent increase that was forecast in April 2010 for all of 2010, and the 5.7 percent increase predicted in December 2009 for all of 2010. The 15 industries reporting increases (highest to lowest) in revenues in 2010 are: Primary Metals; Fabricated Metal Products; Machinery; Plastics & Rubber Products; Transportation Equipment; Computer & Electronic Products; Chemical Products; Apparel, Leather & Allied Products; Paper Products; Textile Mills; Wood Products; Miscellaneous Manufacturing; Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products; Printing & Related Support Activities; and Electrical Equipment, Appliances & Components. Non-Manufacturing: Non-manufacturing supply management executives report that business revenues for 2010 have increased over 2009 by 0.2 percent. This is slightly less than the 0.3 percent increase predicted in April 2010 for all of 2010. This compares to a 1.3 percent increase reported one year ago for 2009 revenues over 2008 revenues. The 46 percent of respondents reporting better business in 2010 than in 2009 estimate an average nominal (before adjusting for inflation) revenue increase of 8.9 percent. This is in contrast to an average nominal decrease of 15.4 percent reported by the 25 percent of respondents who indicate worse business in 2010. The remaining 29 percent have experienced no change in 2010. The eight industries reporting increases in revenues in 2010 — listed in order — are: Mining; Management of Companies & Support Services; Information; Retail Trade; Wholesale Trade; Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting; Other Services; and Finance & Insurance. Business Revenues Prediction for 2011 - Manufacturing: Purchasers forecast that 2011 will be weaker than 2010 as measured by their revenue expectations. The 65 percent of respondents forecasting better business in 2011 than in 2010 estimate an average nominal (before adjusting for inflation) increase of 13.1 percent in their organizations' revenues. This is in contrast to an average nominal decrease of 26.9 percent forecast by the 11 percent who predict worse business in 2011. Including the 24 percent who see no change in 2011, the forecast for overall net nominal increase in business revenues for 2011 over 2010 is 5.6 percent. The following 16 manufacturing industries expecting revenue improvement over 2010 — listed in order — are: Primary Metals; Fabricated Metal Products; Petroleum & Coal Products; Apparel, Leather & Allied Products; Transportation Equipment; Miscellaneous Manufacturing; Furniture & Related Products; Plastics & Rubber Products; Machinery; Textile Mills; Wood Products; Electrical Equipment, Appliances & Components; Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products; Printing & Related Support Activities; Chemical Products; and Paper Products. Non-Manufacturing: Non-manufacturing survey respondents forecast that business revenues for 2011 will be improved over 2010 by an average of 3.4 percent. This is substantially more than the 0.2 percent increase reported for 2010, and also more than the 4.5 percent decrease reported one year ago for 2009 revenues over 2008 revenues. The 51 percent of respondents forecasting better business in 2011 than in 2010 estimate an average nominal (before adjusting for inflation) revenue increase of 8.8 percent. This is in contrast to an average nominal decrease of 9 percent forecast by the 12 percent who predict worse business in 2011. The remaining 37 percent see no change in 2011. The 12 industries expecting increases in revenues in 2011 — in order of percentage increase — are: Mining; Transportation & Warehousing; Retail Trade; Information; Wholesale Trade; Accommodation & Food Services; Management of Companies & Support Services; Finance & Insurance; Utilities; Educational Services; Other Services; and Health Care & Social Assistance. Profit Margins - Manufacturing: Survey respondents report that profit margins increased on average during the second and third quarters of 2010 as 39 percent experienced an increase in profit margins, 29 percent had lower margins, and 32 percent reported no change. However, expectations are for a slight improvement between now and April of 2011 as 31 percent of respondents forecast better profit margins, 20 percent predict lower profit margins, and 49 percent predict no change. Non-Manufacturing: Non-manufacturing supply management executives were asked about changes in profit margins that their organizations recently experienced and are expecting in the near future. Their responses indicate that 26 percent experienced an increase in profit margins during the second and third quarters of 2010, while 31 percent found smaller profit margins, and 43 percent had no change in margins during the same period. Looking ahead from now through April 2011, 34 percent of supply managers expect improved profit margins, 18 percent expect lower profit margins, and the remaining 48 percent of respondents anticipate no change in their profit margins. Business Comparison - The First Half of 2011 with Last Half of 2010 - Manufacturing: Looking ahead to the first half of 2011, survey respondents are optimistic about the next half year. Comparing their outlook for the first half of 2011 to the last half of 2010, 45 percent predict it will be better, 17 percent predict it will be worse, and 38 percent expect no change. Compared to the diffusion index for the same relative prediction one year ago (64 percent), respondents are equally as optimistic about prospects in the manufacturing sector for the first half year (64 percent). The 13 industries expecting improvement in 2011 — listed in order — are: Primary Metals; Petroleum & Coal Products; Textile Mills; Transportation Equipment; Paper Products; Apparel, Leather & Allied Products; Miscellaneous Manufacturing; Fabricated Metal Products; Machinery; Plastics & Rubber Products; Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products; Computer & Electronic Products; and Chemical Products. Non-Manufacturing: The first half of 2011 is predicted to be stronger than the last half of 2010, according to non-manufacturing purchasing and supply managers. The diffusion index indicating current expectations is 60 percent. Thirty-seven percent of respondents expect the first half of next year to be better than the last half of this year, 17 percent anticipate it will be worse, and 46 percent predict no change. The eight industries expecting improvement in the first half of 2010 — listed in order — are: Mining; Accommodation & Food Services; Transportation & Warehousing; Finance & Insurance; Wholesale Trade; Educational Services; Retail Trade; and Utilities. Note: A diffusion index above 50 percent would generally indicate an expectation of the first half of the coming year being better than the second half of the current year. The Second Half of 2011 with the First Half of 2011 - Manufacturing: Purchasing and supply executives are more optimistic about the second half of 2011 compared to the first half of the year. The percentage of survey respondents who forecast the second half of 2011 to be better than the first half is 49 percent, while 6 percent expect it to be worse, and 45 percent expect no change. The 17 industries predicting improvement in the second half of 2011 — listed in order — are: Primary Metals; Petroleum & Coal Products; Wood Products; Furniture & Related Products; Electrical Equipment, Appliances & Components; Nonmetallic Mineral Products; Fabricated Metal Products; Miscellaneous Manufacturing; Transportation Equipment; Apparel, Leather & Allied Products; Computer & Electronic Products; Plastics & Rubber Products; Printing & Related Support Activities; Chemical Products; Paper Products; Food, Beverage & Tobacco Products; and Machinery. Non-Manufacturing: Comparing the second half of 2011 to the first half, non-manufacturing purchasing and supply executives feel more optimistic than they do for the first half of the year compared to the last half of 2010 (diffusion index of 60 percent compared to 68.5 percent). The percentage of respondents who currently forecast the second half of 2010 to be better than the first half is 47 percent, while 10 percent expect it to be worse. An additional 43 percent of purchasers expect no change. The 14 industries expecting improvement in the second half of the year — listed in order — are: Mining; Utilities; Accommodation & Food Services; Information; Transportation & Warehousing; Finance & Insurance; Wholesale Trade; Retail Trade; Management of Companies & Support Services; Construction; Arts, Entertainment & Recreation; Other Services; Health Care & Social Assistance; and Public Administration. Note: A diffusion index above 50 percent would generally indicate an expectation of the second half of the coming year being better than the first half. Supply Chain Practices In 2011 - Manufacturing: In response to a special question regarding supply chain optimization, 71 percent of purchasing and supply executives plan to take new steps in 2011 to improve their supply chain management practices. The favored approaches are listed below: Improved inventory/asset management; cost reduction; supplier development/better metrics; supplier consolidation; better risk management. Non-Manufacturing: Responding to a special question regarding supply chain improvements in 2011, 62 percent of respondents stated that they plan to take steps during the coming year to improve their supply chain management practices. The five most frequently cited approaches are listed below: Process improvement; enhancement and leverage of technology; product rationalization; supplier management/consolidation; improved inventory management; strategic cost management. Inventory-To-Sales Ratio - Manufacturing: Purchasers will be decreasing inventory on hand, by an average of 0.8 percent, to support their planned level of sales during 2011. In this forecast, 18 percent expect to increase their purchased inventory-to-sales ratio during 2011. This is in contrast to 25 percent who expect the ratio to decrease, and 57 percent who predict no change. The diffusion index of 46.5 percent indicates the inventory-to-sales ratio will decrease. Non-Manufacturing: Of the 68 percent of non-manufacturing purchasers who answered this question, 9 percent anticipate increasing their purchased inventory-to-sales ratio during 2011. An additional 13 percent expect their ratio to drop, and 78 percent see no change. The diffusion index of 48 percent suggests the inventory-to-sales ratio will contract in 2011 by an average of 0.1 percent. Note: A diffusion index above 50 percent would indicate an increase in the inventory-to-sales ratio; below 50 percent, a decrease in the ratio. Outlook For The Next 12 Months - Manufacturing: Survey respondents are slightly more optimistic about the next 12 months, when compared to their response in December 2009. The 57 percent who report a better outlook is greater than the 55 percent response received in December 2009. The 34 percent who report that the outlook is the same is lower than the 35 percent reported in December 2009, and the 9 percent who indicated the outlook to be worse is lower than the 10 percent reported in December 2009. Non-Manufacturing: Non-manufacturing survey respondents have a slightly more positive outlook now compared to when they looked ahead in December 2009. The 51 percent who currently report a better outlook is slightly higher than the 50 percent who had that outlook in December 2009. Thirty-five percent expect no change, and 14 percent feel the outlook will be worse over the next 12 months. U.S. Dollar — Predicted Strength vs. Major Trading Currencies — In 2011 — Manufacturing Only - Manufacturing: Purchasing and supply executives are pessimistic concerning the prospective strength of the U.S. dollar for 2011. The average diffusion index for this forecast is 44.1 percent, slightly stronger than the December 2009 forecast average of 40.5 percent for 2010. The U.S. dollar is expected to weaken against all of the major currencies except the Mexican Peso. Note: A diffusion index above 50 percent would predict a generally stronger U.S. dollar; below 50 percent, a generally weaker U.S. dollar, with the distance from 50 percent indicative of the predicted strength or weakness. Summary - Manufacturing: The manufacturing sector is currently expanding, and the forecast indicates that it will continue to expand in the first half of 2011 and at a faster rate in the second half of 2011. The U.S. dollar is expected to weaken on average versus major trading partner currencies in 2011. Overall attitude of manufacturing management is optimistic, with 91 percent of respondents predicting 2011 will be the same as or better than 2010. Non-Manufacturing: The non-manufacturing sector continues to expand and the forecast indicates an increased rate of expansion in 2011. Overall attitude of non-manufacturing supply managers: Mostly positive outlook, with 86 percent of respondents predicting 2011 will be the same as or better than 2010. In addition to the forecast, the Manufacturing ISM Report On Business is issued monthly and is considered by many economists to be the most reliable near-term economic barometer available. It is reviewed regularly by government agencies and economic business leaders. The report, compiled from responses to questions asked of purchasing and supply executives across the country, tracks industrial production, new orders, inventories, supplier deliveries, imports, exports, backlog of orders, employment, customers' inventories, buying policies and p rices. The report has been issued by the association since 1931, except during World War II. Covering the non-manufacturing sector, ISM debuted the Non-Manufacturing ISM Report On Business in June 1998. The Non-Manufacturing ISM Report On Business is released on the third business day of each month, and is based on data received from purchasing and supply executives across the country. The report covers business activity, new orders, backlog of orders, new export orders, inventory change, inventory sentiment, imports, prices, employment, and supplier deliveries. The Manufacturing and Non-Manufacturing ISM Report On Business is published monthly by the Institute for Supply Management. The Institute for Supply Management, established in 1915, is the largest supply management organization in the world as well as one of the most respected. ISM's mission is to lead the supply management profession through its standards of excellence, research, promotional activities and education.

Institute for Supply Management
www.ism.ws


Market Report

Europe Tire Market Forecast And Opportunities - 2019 - 8/28/2014
Sustainability In The Tire Industry 2014 - 8/27/2014
Demand For Rubber Products In China To Reach 740 Billion Yuan - 8/14/2014
New Nanomaterials Promise A Sustainable Future For The Tire Industry - 8/4/2014
IRSG Offers Latest World Rubber Industry Outlook - 7/24/2014
Chloroprene Rubber 2014 Global Strategic Business Report Released - 7/18/2014
Italian Rubber And Plastics Machinery Exports Report Encouraging First Quarter - 7/15/2014
Rubber industry report available from IRSG - 7/8/2014
Lucrative Growth Market For Silicones - 6/13/2014
Global thermoplastic elastomers market to hit $15 billion valuation - 6/11/2014
Resurgent Demand From End-Use Markets To Fuel Growth In Global Industrial Rubber Products Market - 5/29/2014
World Demand For Kaolin To Reach 28.7 Million Metric Tons - 4/29/2014
International Rubber Study Group Report Examines First Quarter Of 2014 - 3/26/2014
Chemical Plants To Evolve - 3/26/2014
Profound Changes Expected For The Stabilizers Market - 3/18/2014
OTR Tire Market Industry Report - 2/24/2014
Rubber Product Manufacturing In Canada Examined - 1/27/2014
China Tire Industry Report, 2013-2017 - 1/3/2014
2013 Forecast For Italian Plastics And Rubber Machinery Industry Released - 1/3/2014
Vietnam To Become Third Largest Rubber Exporter - 1/2/2014
World Rubber Consumption Seen Climbing As Tire Demand Grows - 11/18/2013
International Rubber Study Group Reports On Third Quarter Of 2013 - 11/18/2013
Strong Growth Projected For Americas Composites Industry - 11/12/2013
Manifold Developments On The Market For Butadiene - 10/23/2013
Synthetic Latex Polymers, A $30 Billion Plus Market That Is Building Globally - 10/22/2013
Global Petrochemical Prices Rose Nearly 2 Percent In September - 10/7/2013
Global Demand For Thermoplastic Elastomers To Reach 5.8 Million Metric Tons In 2017 - 8/30/2013
International Rubber Study Group reports on second quarter of 2013 - 7/15/2013
Automotive industry outlook and review presented - 7/11/2013
Hankook Tire Gauge Index shows decline in summer driving - 7/9/2013
Global and Chinese tire mold industry examined - 7/8/2013
Ceresana provides complete analysis of global market for rubber - 7/8/2013
Italian rubber and plastics machinery exports face uncertain start to the year - 7/8/2013
Worldwide Industrial Rubber Products Market To Witness Steady Growth - 1/8/2013
No growth for 2012 tire shipments; two percent rebound anticipated in 2013 - 12/31/2012
European Tire Market Opportunities Reviewed - 10/5/2012
Tire and Rubber Recycling Industry Has Grown 1.7 Percent Annually For Past Five Years - 9/14/2012
2012 Tire Shipments Expected To Grow By 1.2 Percent - 8/13/2012
Transportation To Drive Global Thermoplastic Composites Market - 7/25/2012
Top Ten States For Manufacturing Jobs - 7/25/2012
Rubber Machinery Trade Back On Track - 7/19/2012
Global Automotive Tire Market Forecast To Reach $187 Billion In 2017 - 7/14/2012
Thermoplastics Bucking TPE Industry Trends - 6/26/2012
Rubber Consumption Increased Four Percent In 2011 - 6/13/2012
Global Demand For Industrial Rubber Products To Reach $140 Billion In 2016 - 5/31/2012
U.S. Demand For Gaskets & Seals To Reach $9.6 Billion In 2016 - 5/29/2012
Sustained Demand From Industrial And Automotive Sectors Drives Global Nitrile Butadiene Rubber Market - 5/17/2012
Rubber Consumption To Approach 31 Million Metric Tons In 2015 - 5/10/2012
Buying Tires Over Internet Reported To Be More Attractive For Drivers - 4/20/2012
World Demand For Rubber Processing Chemicals To Rise 4.7 Percent Annually Through 2015 - 4/10/2012
Global Rubber Consumption To Approach 31 Million Metric Tons In 2015 - 3/29/2012
Tire shipments to increase by approximately 2 percent - 3/8/2012
Global Demand For Tires To Reach 3.3 Billion Units In 2015 - 2/29/2012
Global Demand For Kaolin To Exceed 28 Million Metric Tons In 2015 - 2/28/2012
Indian Tire Market Expected To Grow Through 2017 - 2/28/2012
New Epichlorohydrin Manufacturing Technologies Based On Renewable Resources Boost Chinese Production - 2/28/2012
Global Gaskets And Seals Market To Reach $30 Billion By 2017 - 2/23/2012
Positive Outlook Predicted For Russian Rubber And Plastics Market - 2/8/2012
U.S. Carbon Black Trade Back On Track - 2/8/2012
Global Rubber Demand Forecast To Reach 27.2 Million Metric Tons In 2012 - 1/25/2012
IRSG Expects Five Percent Growth In Rubber Consumption - 1/9/2012
Heavy Duty OTR Tire Manufacturing To Gain Traction Over The Next Five Years - 12/2/2011
Global Chloroprene Rubber Market To Reach 445.3 Thousand Metric Tons By 2017 - 11/21/2011
Global Tires Market To Reach 1.8 Billion Units By 2017 - 11/11/2011
World Demand For Thermoplastic Elastomers To Approach 5.6 Million Metric Tons in 2015, Freedonia Reports - 10/17/2011
Global Long Fiber Thermoplastics Market To Reach 313.4 Thousand Tons By 2017 - 10/5/2011
IRSG Forecasts Rubber Consumption Growth - 9/29/2011
U.S. Tire Imports, Exports Continue Growth - 9/9/2011
Global Silicone Market Forecast To Reach $17.2 Billion By 2017 - 8/26/2011
Improving Economic Outlook On Tap For Chemical Processing Industry - 8/18/2011
2011 Tire Shipments To Grow Nearly 4 Percent - 8/5/2011
Yokohama Senior VP Of Sales And Marketing Gives Mid-Year Report - 7/25/2011
Latest Rubber Statistical Bulletin/Rubber Industry Report Available From IRSG - 7/5/2011
China Imports More Natural Rubber To Meet Booming Demand - 6/15/2011
U.S. Demand For Specialty Silicas To Reach $1.7 Billion In 2015 - 5/19/2011
U.S. Farm Tire Market Examined - 5/11/2011
Global Styrene-Butadiene-Styrene (SBS) Block Copolymer Market To Reach 1.9 Million Tons By 2017 - 4/20/2011
Global Nitrile Butadiene Rubber Market To Exceed 645 Thousand Tons By 2017 - 4/11/2011
Global Tetrahydrofuran Market To Exceed 800 Thousand Tons By 2017 - 4/11/2011
Global Market For Chloroprene Rubber To Reach 445.3 Thousand Metric Tons By 2017 - 4/5/2011
2011 Tire Shipments To Grow Three Percent - 3/24/2011
Automotive Industry Outlook And Review For March 2011 - 3/14/2011
U.S, Tire Shipments Increase More Than 10 Percent In 2010 - 2/17/2011
Rubber Demand Bounces Back, More Growth Seen - 2/8/2011
Automotive Coating, Adhesive And Sealant Demand To Rise 9.4 Percent - 2/8/2011
Growing Optimism In Manufacturing As 49% Plan To Increase Hiring In Next Six Months - 1/27/2011
Polyurethane Processors, Suppliers Head Into 2011 With Optimistic Outlook - 1/5/2011
Economic Growth Continues In 2011 - 12/8/2010
2010 U.S. Tire Shipments To Post Nine Percent Increase - 12/2/2010
Tire Manufacturers Emphasize Design As Low Rolling Resistant And Eco-Friendly Tires Gain Popularity - 11/22/2010
Automotive Industry Outlook Highlighted - 11/4/2010
Global Industrial Rubber Products Market To Reach $88.5 Billion By 2015 - 10/18/2010
Indian Tire Industry Analyzed - 10/6/2010
IRSG Says Global Output Of Rubber Increased 8.9 Percent - 10/4/2010
Indian Tire Industry Forecasted To 2014 - 9/1/2010
Platts Global Petrochemical Index Ended July Higher On Late Rally - 8/12/2010
2010 Tire Shipments To Increase Eight Percent - 8/11/2010
World Demand For Specialty Silicas To Reach 2.7 Million Metric Tons In 2014 - 6/11/2010
Rate Of Decline In Petrochemical Prices Picks Up Pace In May - 6/11/2010
Global and China Automotive Tire Companies Will See Revenue Growth, But Profit Fall in 2010 - 6/9/2010
Rubber Loses Support Of Crude Oil, Currencies And Commodity Stocks - 5/26/2010
Chinese Tire Industry Predictions for 2010-2011 - 5/19/2010
Rubber Crisis Looms, May Hit India Hard - 5/3/2010
U.S. Industrial Rubber Products Market To Reach $17.7 Billion In 2014 - 4/27/2010
Global Tire Cord Market To Exceed 1.3 Million Metric Tons By 2015 - 4/14/2010
Auto Industry Outlook for 2010 - 4/14/2010
World Industrial Rubber Products Demand To Grow By 4.5 Percent - 4/12/2010
Tire Industry Market Report 2010 - 3/29/2010
2010 Tire Shipments To Increase Three Percent - 3/22/2010
World Demand For Carbon Black To Reach 11.6 MMT In 2013 - 3/12/2010
Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene Copolymer Demand To Grow In 2010 - 2/22/2010
World Rubber Consumption To Reach 26.9 Million Metric Tons In 2013 - 2/22/2010
Signs of Timid Recovery in 2009 - 2/12/2010
Elastomers Distributor Sees Signs of Market Recovery - 2/1/2010
IRSG Offers Latest Rubber Statistical Bulletin - 1/6/2010
2009 Tire Shipments To Post Thirteen Percent Decline - 12/14/2009
Research Report On Chinese Rubber Industry, 2008-2009 - 10/7/2009
2009 Tire Shipments Revised To Drop 16 Percent - 8/12/2009
NR Supply Heading Into A Historical Fall - Review Of 12 Months Ended June 2009 - 7/21/2009
Natural Rubber Supply And Demand Forecast And Price Outlook - 6/30/2009
More Old Tires Put To New Uses; Scrap Tire Piles Receding - 6/24/2009
Global rubber consumption drops to lowest level since 2006 - 6/15/2009
Natural Rubber Production Dropped Drastically During January To April 2009 - 6/2/2009
High Growth Forecasted For The Global And China Tire Market, 2008-2009 - 5/8/2009
Global Production Of Natural Rubber On The Decline - 4/17/2009
U.S. Demand For Specialty Silicas To Reach $1.7 Billion In 2013 - 4/15/2009
World Natural Rubber Output To See Biggest Fall Since 1993 - 4/15/2009
China Holds Key To Rubber Production Rebound - 4/3/2009
World Demand For Nonwovens To Approach 8 Million Metric Tons In 2012 - 4/1/2009
China Is Leading Rubber Importer From Viet Nam - 3/26/2009
Poor Car Sales May Curb Global Demand For Rubber - 3/26/2009
2009 Tire Shipments To Drop Seven Percent - 3/17/2009
Dubai Rubber Imports And Exports Hit AED 7.8 Billion In 2008 - 3/16/2009
IRSG Forecast:: Rubber Consumption Will Decline - 3/10/2009
2008 Tire Shipments Drop More Than 6%, Says RMA - 2/24/2009
Natural Rubber Prices In India Decline In Fourth Quarter - 2/24/2009
Thailand May Purchase 200,000 Metric Tons Of Rubber - 2/24/2009
Vietnamese Rubber Sector Deals With Economic Crisis - 2/24/2009



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