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Carbon black shortage threatens Indian manufacturing industry  

Monday, February 19, 2018

Mumbai, India - The Hindu Business Line reports that a huge shortage of carbon black, one of the key raw materials for making rubber products, has pushed a large number of Indian non-tire small and medium rubber companies to the verge of closure. The shortage of supply has intensified after an increase in demand from large established domestic tire manufacturers post the increase of import duty on tires to 15 percent from 10 percent. Interestingly, domestic carbon black manufacturers are still exporting 9,000-14,000 tonnes a month despite lower realization. Carbon black in the domestic market is priced at $1,450 a metric ton, while global prices are at about $1,200 a metric ton. Non-tire manufacturers cannot rely on imports as there is a duty of $36.17 a metric ton on imports from Russia and $397 a metric ton from China while it is $494 a metric ton on shipments from other countries. Currently, the carbon black demand, including that of tire manufacturers, is at 12.85 lakh metric tons, while the country’s manufacturing capacity is at 9.5 lakh metric tons. Kamal Chowdhury, president, All India Rubber Industries Association, said the impact of the carbon black shortage is so severe over the past few months that over 1,000 small-scale units are on the verge of closure leading to loss of nearly 2 lakh jobs, while the entire industry is losing about ₹750 crore every month. The largest carbon black manufacturers in India include Philips Carbon Black, SKI Carbon Black and Himadri Speciality Chemicals. The association has moved the government to remove the import duty till the domestic supply improves. The small and medium units are involved in making various rubber products such as conveyor belts and auto parts. It has also asked the government to conduct cost audit on carbon black manufacturing companies to find whether the companies have jacked up the prices taking advantage of the shortage in the market. Carbon black is the most preferred reinforcing material and filler in rubber products, both in the tyre and non-tire segments, constituting 30 percent of the product by weight. It is also used in plastics, paints and inks as coloring pigments. The cost component of carbon black is nearing the cost of primary rubber, while it has historically been at half that cost. - * Email

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Silicone surfactants market forecast to reach $5.73 billion by 2022  

Monday, February 19, 2018

Pune, India - The silicone surfactants market is estimated to be $4.19 billion in 2017 and is projected to reach $5.73 billion by 2022, at a CAGR of 6.5 percent from 2017 to 2022. The growth of the silicone surfactants market can be attributed to increasing demand for silicone surfactants from the personal care and other end-use industries. Stringent environmental regulations against the use of conventional surfactants provide a prospect for growth to the silicone surfactants market. The growth of this segment can be attributed to the increasing use of silicone surfactants in the personal care, construction, and paints & coatings industries. Features such as spreadability and softness make silicone surfactants preferable for use as emulsifiers in personal care products, polyurethane foams, and coatings, among other applications. Based on end-use industry, the personal care segment is estimated to lead the silicone surfactants market in 2017, and this trend is expected to continue in the coming years. The growth of the personal care segment can be attributed to the increasing use of silicone surfactants in skincare, haircare, and personal hygiene products. Growing demand for personal care products from the emerging economies, such as China and India, is fueling the growth of the personal care industry. The Asia Pacific region is estimated to lead the silicone surfactants market in 2017 and is expected to continue its dominance in the near future. The upsurge in the number of working women and increasing e-commerce activities have led to the rise in demand for personal care products in this region. The high demand for silicone surfactants from the personal care industry in countries, such as China and India, is a key factor driving the growth of the Asia Pacific silicone surfactants market. Key players operating in the silicone surfactants market include Evonik Industries (Germany), Dow Corning (U.S.), Momentive Performance Materials (US), Wacker Chemie (Germany), Innospec (U.S.), Shin-Etsu Chemical (Japan), Siltech (Canada), Elé (U.S.), Elkem (France), Supreme Silicones (India), Silibase Silicone (China), Jiangsu Maysta Chemical (China), Elkay Chemicals (India), Hangzhou Ruijiang Performance Material Science (China), Harcros Chemicals (U.S.), and SST Australia (Australia). - * Email

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Iowa State University engineers develop metal infused elastomer that can support 50 times its weight  

Monday, February 19, 2018

Ames, IA - A new smart and responsive material can stiffen up like a worked-out muscle, say the Iowa State University engineers who developed it. Stress a muscle and it gets stronger. Mechanically stress the rubbery material, say with a twist or a bend, and the material automatically stiffens by up to 300 percent, the engineers said. In lab tests, mechanical stresses transformed a flexible strip of the material into a hard composite that can support 50 times its own weight. This new composite material does not need outside energy sources such as heat, light or electricity to change its properties. And it could be used in a variety of ways, including applications in medicine and industry. The researchers found a simple, low-cost way to produce particles of undercooled metal, that is metal that remains liquid even below its melting temperature. The tiny particles (they are just 1 to 20 millionths of a meter across) are created by exposing droplets of melted metal to oxygen, creating an oxidation layer that coats the droplets and stops the liquid metal from turning solid. They also found ways to mix the liquid-metal particles with a rubbery elastomer material without breaking the particles. When this hybrid material is subject to mechanical stresses, pushing, twisting, bending, squeezing, the liquid-metal particles break open. The liquid metal flows out of the oxide shell, fuses together and solidifies. “You can squeeze these particles just like a balloon,” Thuo said. “When they pop, that is what makes the metal flow and solidify.” The result, researchers said, is a “metal mesh that forms inside the material.” Thuo and Bartlett said the popping point can be tuned to make the liquid metal flow after varying amounts of mechanical stress. Tuning could involve changing the metal used, changing the particle sizes or changing the soft material. The engineers say the new material could be used in medicine to support delicate tissues or in industry to protect valuable sensors. There could also be uses in soft and bio-inspired robotics or reconfigurable and wearable electronics. The Iowa State University Research Foundation is working to patent the material and it is available for licensing. “A device with this material can flex up to a certain amount of load,but if you continue stressing it, the elastomer will stiffen and stop or slow down these forces.” And that, the engineers say, is how they’re putting some muscle in their new smart material. - * Email

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Kuraray announces price increase for Septon, Hybrar and TU-Polymer  

Monday, February 19, 2018

Tokyo, Japan - Kuraray's Elastomers Business Unit will raise the transaction prices of following elastomer products in all regions effective March 1, 2018 or as existing supply agreements allow all Septon, Hybrar and TU-Polymer: $0.25 per kilogram. ($0.11 per pound). Increasing feedstock prices from late fall 2017 have increased the costs to produce these specialty high performance materials. It is necessary to recover a portion of these increases to ensure ongoing supply and new product innovation. - * Email

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Cooper Tire announces 184th consecutive quarterly dividend  

Monday, February 19, 2018

Findlay, OH - Cooper Tire & Rubber Company announced a quarterly dividend of 10.5 cents per share on common stock, payable March 29, 2018 to stockholders of record at the close of business March 1, 2018. This will mark the 184th consecutive quarterly dividend paid by Cooper Tire & Rubber Company. - * Email

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Goldsmith & Eggleton Incorporated, an employee- owned company, is engaged in the manufacture and distribution of rubber raw materials. Since our founding in 1968 our mission is to provide customers with consistent quality polymers that adhere to specification and provide economic value. G&E's Reliable Polymer Alternatives are used by original equipment manufacturers in a variety of diverse applications. G&E's quality system is registered to ISO 9001: 2000. We supply customers throughout the world from our Processing facility in Wadsworth Ohio. G&E provides the experience of seasoned industry professionals and the commitment of employee owners to continuous improvement.


 
 
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